Publication Abstracts

Carlson et al. 2022

Carlson, B., A.A. Lacis, G.L. Russell, A. Marshak, and W. Su, 2022: Unique observational constraints on the seasonal and longitudinal variability of the Earth's planetary albedo and cloud distribution inferred from EPIC measurements. Front. Remote Sens., 2, 788525, doi:10.3389/frsen.2021.788525.

Thorough comparison to observations is key to developing a credible climate model forecasting capability. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) measurements of Earth's reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation provide a unique observational perspective that permits a more reliable model/data comparison than is possible with the otherwise available satellite data. The uniqueness is in the DSCOVR satellite's viewing geometry, which enables continuous viewing of the Earth's sunlit hemisphere from its Lissajous orbit around the Lagrangian L1 point. The key instrument is the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC), which views the Earth's sunlit hemisphere with 1024-by-1024-pixel imagery in 10 narrow spectral bands from 317 nm to 780 nm, acquiring up to 22 high spatial resolution images per day. The additional feature is that the frequency of EPIC image acquisition is nearly identical to that of the climate GCM data generation scheme where climate data for the entire globe are 'instantaneously' calculated at one-hour radiation time-step intervals. Implementation of the SHS (Sunlit Hemisphere Sampling) EPIC-view geometry for the in-line GCM output data sampling establishes a precise self-consistency in the space-time data sampling between EPIC observational and GCM output data generation and sampling. The remaining problem is that the GCM generated data are radiative fluxes, while the EPIC measurements are backscatter-dependent radiances. Radiance to flux conversion is a complex problem with no simple way to convert GCM radiative fluxes into spectral radiances. The more expedient approach is to convert the EPIC spectral radiances into broadband radiances by MODIS/CERES-based regression relationships and then into solar radiative fluxes using the CERES angular distribution models. Averaging over the sunlit hemisphere fully suppresses the meteorological weather noise, but preserves the intra-seasonal and larger spatial scale variability. Longitudinal slicing by the Earth's rotation then permits a self-consistent model/data comparison of the longitudinal model/data differences in the variability of the reflected solar radiation. Ancillary EPIC Composite data provide additional cloud property information for climate model diagnostics. Comparison of EPIC-derived seasonal and longitudinal variability of the Earth's planetary albedo with the GISS ModelE2 results shows systematic overestimate of cloud reflectivity over the Pacific Ocean with corresponding underestimates over continental land areas.

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BibTeX Citation

@article{ca02820w,
  author={Carlson, B. and Lacis, A. A. and Russell, G. L. and Marshak, A. and Su, W.},
  title={Unique observational constraints on the seasonal and longitudinal variability of the Earth's planetary albedo and cloud distribution inferred from EPIC measurements},
  year={2022},
  journal={Front. Remote Sens.},
  volume={2},
  pages={788525},
  doi={10.3389/frsen.2021.788525},
}

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RIS Citation

TY  - JOUR
ID  - ca02820w
AU  - Carlson, B.
AU  - Lacis, A. A.
AU  - Russell, G. L.
AU  - Marshak, A.
AU  - Su, W.
PY  - 2022
TI  - Unique observational constraints on the seasonal and longitudinal variability of the Earth's planetary albedo and cloud distribution inferred from EPIC measurements
JA  - Front. Remote Sens.
VL  - 2
SP  - 788525
DO  - 10.3389/frsen.2021.788525
ER  -

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