Publication Abstracts

Anderson et al. 2009

Anderson, B.T., A.C. Ruane, J.O. Roads, and M. Kanamitsu, 2009: Estimating the influence of evaporation and moisture-flux convergence upon seasonal precipitation rates. Part II: An analysis for North America based upon the NCEP-DOE Reanalysis II Model. J. Hydrometeorol., 10, 893-911, doi:10.1175/2009JHM1063.1.

In this paper, a diagnostic metric — termed the local-convergence ratio — is used to analyze the contribution of evaporation and atmospheric moisture-flux convergence to model-based estimates of climatological precipitation over the North American continent. Generally, the fractional evaporative contribution is largest during spring and summer when evaporation is largest and decreases as evaporation decreases. However, there appears to be at least three regions with distinct spatiotemporal seasonal evolutions of this ratio. Over both the northern and western portions of the continent, the fractional evaporative contribution peaks in spring and early summer and decreases during fall and into winter. Over the northern portion, this fall decrease is related to an increase in atmospheric moisture-flux convergence associated with enhanced meridional moisture fluxes into the region; over the western coastal regions, the fall decrease in evaporative contribution is associated with a decrease in evaporation and an increase in total moisture-flux convergence, most likely associated with increased storm activity. In contrast, over the central portions of the continent, the fractional evaporative contribution to precipitation remains relatively low in spring — when enhanced low-level jet activity increases the low-level atmospheric moisture flux convergence into the region — and instead peaks in summer and fall — when the moisture-flux convergence associated with the low-level jet decreases and precipitation is balanced predominantly by local evaporation. Finally, over the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, the fractional evaporative contribution to precipitation is found to contain a wintertime minimum as well as a secondary minimum during summer. This latter feature is due to a substantial increase in low-level atmospheric moisture-flux convergence associated with the large-scale monsoon circulation that influences this region during this time.

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BibTeX Citation

@article{an01100t,
  author={Anderson, B. T. and Ruane, A. C. and Roads, J. O. and Kanamitsu, M.},
  title={Estimating the influence of evaporation and moisture-flux convergence upon seasonal precipitation rates. Part II: An analysis for North America based upon the NCEP-DOE Reanalysis II Model},
  year={2009},
  journal={J. Hydrometeorol.},
  volume={10},
  pages={893--911},
  doi={10.1175/2009JHM1063.1},
}

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RIS Citation

TY  - JOUR
ID  - an01100t
AU  - Anderson, B. T.
AU  - Ruane, A. C.
AU  - Roads, J. O.
AU  - Kanamitsu, M.
PY  - 2009
TI  - Estimating the influence of evaporation and moisture-flux convergence upon seasonal precipitation rates. Part II: An analysis for North America based upon the NCEP-DOE Reanalysis II Model
JA  - J. Hydrometeorol.
VL  - 10
SP  - 893
EP  - 911
DO  - 10.1175/2009JHM1063.1
ER  -

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