Publication Abstracts

Chandler et al. 1989

Chandler, M.A., D.J. Goggin, and L.W. Lake, 1989: A mechanical field permeameter for making rapid, non-destructive, permeability measurements. J. Sediment. Petrol., 59, 613-635.

Permeability, because it is the only elementary rock property related directly to fluid flow, is an especially important formation characteristic. Unfortunately, permeability is difficult to measure accurately, and its correlation with many other rock properties has not been generally established. The conventional method of measuring the permeability of outcrops, hand samples, and core slabs requires that a core plug be drilled from the rock of unknown permeability. The plug is placed in a special core-plug holder, a confining pressure is applied to its sides, and fluid is forced across the length of the plug. The rate of flow and the pressure difference are measured to obtain the permeability from Darcy's law. This approach is time consuming, cannot measure the permeability of outcrops in situ, and is destructive to often valuable outcrops and samples. We have constructed a mechanical field permeameter (MFP) that utilizes a method of permeability measurement suggested by Dykstra and Parsons (1950). The MFP is portable and does not require the drilling of core plugs; it is therefore suitable for use on outcrop exposures. In addition to its in situ field capabilities, the MFP has proven useful as a lab device for taking permeability measurements of hand and core samples. Such samples are too unique or valuable to destroy for conventional analysis. We have also improved the analytical technique for calculating the permeability from field measurements and have written a computer algorithm which corrects for gas flow geomtery, gas slippage, and turbulent effects.